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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
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Constitutions and the Politics of Recognition: Some Australian Observations

—Dylan Lino, PhD Candidate, Melbourne Law School; Visiting Researcher, Harvard Law School Constitutions are a major site of contestation in what Charles Taylor has influentially termed the ‘politics of recognition’. As marginalised groups struggle to have their identities properly respected within public institutions, attention frequently turns to the contents of constitutions and the ways in

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Published on July 30, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

—Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on July 28, 2014
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The Scholars Who Bring You “What’s New in Comparative Public Law”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Since January, I-CONnect has published a weekly roundup of news in the world of comparative public law. “What’s New in Comparative Public Law” is a curated reading list of developments in the field. The weekly roundup includes a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent

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Published on July 25, 2014
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Mandates, Manifestos & Coalitions: UK Party Politics after 2010

—Tom Quinn, Essex University [Cross-posted from UK Constitutional Law Blog] One of the most important assumptions underlying this view of British politics since 1945 was that governments were given mandates by voters in elections. That followed from the fact that they were directly elected by voters, as there were no post-election coalition negotiations to intervene

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Published on July 23, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

—Mohamed Abdelaal, Alexandria University (Egypt) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on July 21, 2014
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Direct Democracy and Constitutional Change: Institutional Learning from State Laboratories in the USA

—Jurgen Goossens, Ph.D. Candidate Ghent University, LL.M. Yale Law School Although the federal constitutional amendment procedure in Article V of the U.S. Constitution has not been altered since its adoption 226 years ago, constitutional tradition in the 50 states has substantially evolved. For instance, popular referenda were unknown in 1787, but are now ubiquitous in

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Published on July 18, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Italian Senate Under Reform: From Disguised Unicameralism to a True Regional Second Chamber?

—Antonia Baraggia, University of Milan After the recent attempts to reform the Irish and the Canadian Senates, the Italian second chamber is also undergoing a process of profound transformation. The issue of reforming the Italian second chamber is not a recent development. The Italian Senate has been the subject of debate since the Constitutional Assembly

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Published on July 16, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

—Rohan Alva, Jindal Global Law School In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on July 14, 2014
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A Comment on the European Court of Human Right’s Judgment in S.A.S. v. France

–Antonios Kouroutakis, Oxford University [Editor’s Note: This is the second of two scholarly perspectives published on I-CONnect this week this week on S.A.S. v. France. The first was published here on Wednesday, July 9.] How to balance individual rights with the state intervention to accommodate the interests of the society as whole is an inherently difficult question.

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Published on July 11, 2014
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The Burka Ban before the European Court of Human Rights: A Comment on S.A.S. v. France

—Ioanna Tourkochoriti, Fellow, The Walker Institute for Area Studies and The Rule of Law Collaborative, University of South Carolina [Editor’s Note: This is the first of two scholarly perspectives that I-CONnect will publish this week on S.A.S. v. France. The second will be published on Friday, July 11.] In S.A.S. v. France[1], the European Court of Human Rights

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Published on July 9, 2014
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