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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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One Year After: How the Romanian Constitutional Court Changed its Mind

–Bianca Selejan-Guţan, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Simion Bărnuţiu Faculty of Law July 2012 was the scene of the most important constitutional crisis in Romania since December 1989. I explored some salient aspects of the crisis in an earlier post on this blog. One year after these events, the constitutional amendment process, initiated by the Parliament in

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Published on July 14, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Egypt’s new constitutional declaration: Back to square one?

–Zaid Al-Ali, International IDEA(cross-posted from www.foreignpolicy.com) On July 8, Adli Mansour, Egypt’s new interim president who until recently was a member of the country’s Supreme Constitutional Court, issued yet another “constitutional declaration.”  This comes after a year of failed leadership by former President Mohamed Morsi, the historic June 30 demonstrations, the intervention by the military,

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Published on July 11, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Facing l’etat d’exception: The Greek Crisis Jurisprudence

—Christina M. Akrivopoulou, Adjunct Lecturer, Democritus University of Thrace Greek courts have only recently attempted to control the Memoranda entered into between the Greek state and the European Union and IMF, which impose austerity measures on the country. This judicial self-restraint has mainly been due to the extreme severity of the financial crisis. In theory,

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Published on July 11, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Constitutional Writs as “Weapons” in Myanmar?

—Dr. Melissa Crouch, Postdoctoral Fellow, Law Faculty, National University of Singapore In 2011, Myanmar began its transition to democracy under a civilian-military led government. The process has taken place within the framework of the 2008 Constitution and it has been followed by a range of legal and institutional reforms. One of the important features of

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Published on July 9, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Ireland Considers Move to Unicameral Parliament

—Dr. Oran Doyle, Fellow, Trinity College, Dublin The Irish Government has proposed the abolition of the upper house of Parliament, the Seanad. The Thirty-Second Amendment of the Constitution (Abolition of Seanad Éireann) Bill 2013 contains over 40 discrete amendments to the Constitution designed to abolish the Seanad, reconstitute the Oireachtas as a unicameral parliament, revise

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Published on July 7, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Egypt: Democratic Coup?

The ongoing situation in Egypt calls to mind Ozan Varol’s article in the Harvard International Law Journal on The Democratic Coup d’Etat, itself motivated in part by the 2011 coup against Mubarak.  Varol’s argument in a nutshell is that, simply, that there are coups and then there are coups.  US federal law treats them all

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Published on July 5, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Culture War in the Court: Reproductive Health Battle in the Philippines

—Anna Su, Baldy Postdoctoral Fellow, SUNY Buffalo Law School On July 9, 2013, the Philippine Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on a constitutional challenge lodged against the recently-enacted and widely-controversial Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act of 2012 (“RH Law”). Almost eleven years in the making, the new reproductive health statute unsurprisingly encountered vociferous

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Published on July 2, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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I·CON Book Forum

The current issue of I·CON features an exchange between Alec Stone Sweet and Nico Krisch on Krisch’s recent book, Beyond Constitutionalism: The Pluralist Structure of Post-National Law. We are happy to provide free access to this exchange for I·CONnect readers and to invite you to join the discussion on this blog. Click the titles to

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Published on June 30, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Striking Down Austerity Measures: Crisis Jurisprudence in Europe

—Christina M. Akrivopoulou, Adjunct Lecturer, Democritus University of Thrace Due to the socialist ‘Carnation Revolution’ that led the country to its democratization after 1974, Portugal has inherited one of the most powerful Constitutions of Europe regarding the protection of social rights. Although Portugal’s introduction to the European Union in 1986 has gradually diminished the strong

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Published on June 25, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Says Who?

—Claudia E. Haupt, Associate-in-Law, Columbia Law School Cross-posted from the Center for Law and Religion Forum at St. John’s University School of Law Just in time for my post on symbols, the New York Times picks up the topic as well. So this is page A1 news! Of course, the underlying issue—the treatment of religious

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Published on June 23, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis