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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2011 (Page 5)
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New Hungary Constitution: New Opinions

Our contributor Andrew Arato, along with other leading academics, submitted an amicus brief to the Venice Commission concerning the new Constitution of Hungary. It is in many ways a devastating critique of the new document on both substantive and procedural grounds. The Venice Commission itself released an Opinion on the Constitution earlier this week, arguing

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Published on June 23, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Andrew Arato, constitutional design, hp, Hungary, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Morocco Quiety Reforms Constitution

Without the fanfare (or violence) of Egypt and Tunisia, it seems the Arab Spring is leading to real reform in Morocco. A good summary of the constitutional changes proposed by the King. To be put to national referendum July 1. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/post/a-king-a-speech-and-a-new-constitution-for-morocco/2011/03/29/AGSximcH_blog.html

Published on June 21, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, constitutional change, hp, Jason Gluck
 
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South African Threats to Freedom of Expression

South African Professor of Law Pierre de Vos has an excellent blog posting on a frightening piece of legislation there seeking to ensure many South African government-connected institutions classify or prevent the release of documents that have even the most tangential relationship to national security. http://constitutionallyspeaking.co.za/let-me-tell-you-a-secret/ Unfortunately, this is just another example of the South

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Published on June 20, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Mark Kende
 
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Electoral Politics and Turkey’s New Constitution

On Sunday, June 12, 2011, Turkish voters headed to the ballot boxes to cast their votes in parliamentary elections. According to preliminary results, the incumbent Islamist-leaning Adalet ve Kalkinma Partisi (AKP) (Justice and Development Party) comfortably won a third consecutive term in office, obtaining 49.9% of the popular vote and 326 of the 550 seats

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Published on June 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Turkey
 
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South Sudan consultation wrapping up

Amid continuing clashes in the disputed region of Abyei, the government of South Sudan is concluding a two-day public discussion of the Transitional Constitution, which will come into effect with the official birth of the state next month. The draft has been criticized by one political group, the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-Democratic Change, for failing

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Published on June 8, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, South Sudan, Tom Ginsburg
 
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A Forthcoming Rights Revolution in Mexico?

Two important constitutional reforms have been just approved in Mexico. The first reform transforms the human rights regime in the country. Among other things, it recognizes as rights not only those explicitly included in the constitution but also all rights present in international treaties ratified by the country. The reform also gives new powers to

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Published on June 3, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America, Mexico
 
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Ecuador’s Courts; U.S. Constitutionalism

This post addresses two very distinct but interesting issues. ECUADOR: First, there is a fascinating article in the New York Times regarding the problems with Ecuador’s legal system. It deals with Chevron’s attempt to resist enforcement of a large judgment by attacking the nation’s legal system. Without addressing Chevron’s underlying conduct, what is especially troubling

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Published on May 24, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Mark Kende
 
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Discipline-Flourishing Constitutionalism: An Update on Myanmar’s Quasi-Constitutionalized Politics

When Tom Ginsburg and Zachary Elkins first released their Comparative Constitutions Project data, Myanmar (formerly known as Burma)* was one of only two countries that lacked any sort of constitutional document (the other being the U.K.). Since 1962, the country had been ruled by a military regime. In 1988, a younger generation of officers seized

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Published on May 20, 2011
Author:          Filed under: authoritarianism, Dominic Nardi, hp, Myanmar
 
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In Ecuador, Autocracy by Referendum

A frustrated Simon Bolivar is said to have once complained of his empire that Colombia was a university, Venezuela a barracks, and Ecuador a convent. This assessment seemed surprisingly prescient last week, with a Colombian education minister appointed emergency mayor of Bogota, Venezuela accused by the IISS of arming FARC rebels, and Ecuadorians passing a

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Published on May 19, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Bolivia, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Ecuador, honduras, venezuela
 
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The Indian Supreme Court Headlines the WSJ

Today’s edition of the Wall Street Journal profiles the Indian Supreme Court under the headline of “In India, the Supreme Court Takes an Activist Role.” As the article notes, however, it is an understatement to call the Indian Supreme Court “activist.” It is much more accurate, according to the author, to call it “hyperactivist.” Whether

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Published on May 16, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Richard Albert, Supreme Court of India