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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2011 (Page 2)
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Call for Papers on Comparative Law

As Chair of the Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law, I am pleased to share with our readers the Call for Papers below. The Call for Papers is directed to comparative law scholars who have been engaged as law teachers, lecturers, fellows or another academic capacity for ten years or fewer

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Published on November 4, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Call for Papers, hp, Richard Albert
 
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Iran: Constitutional Politics in a Dictatorship

Last month, the University of Chicago hosted a Conference on Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes. Alas, we did not have a paper on Iran, but it seems that constitutional politics in the world’s favorite theocracy are heating up. Indeed, Iran may be exhibit A for the idea that constitutional politics involve significant stakes even in dictatorships.

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Published on November 3, 2011
Author:          Filed under: authoritarianism, Iran, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Right to Rebel in Venezuela

This is the second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the potential risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel. Case Study 2: Venezuela The seeds

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A Right to Rebel in Venezuela

A second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel. Case Study 2: Venezuela The seeds for democratic governance

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Published on November 1, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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The Conservative Consolidation in Canada

As our colleague Ran Hirschl reported earlier this month, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently filled two vacancies on the Supreme Court of Canada. With those two appointments, four is now the total number of Prime Minister Harper’s Supreme Court nominations since he ascended to power in 2006. A few observations occur to me in

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Published on October 30, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Richard Albert, Stephen Harper, Supreme Court of Canada
 
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Fidel Castro’s Right to Rebel

Tom Ginsburg and I are currently exploring the causes and effects of “right to rebel” provisions in constitutions. One of the country studies we will be including in our upcoming article on the subject is the following example from Cuban History. We would very much welcome any comments on the topic, or suggestions as to

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Published on October 30, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Cuba, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Right to Rebel, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Libya’s Constitution: Take it Slow

More reflections on the time line currently being considered by Libya’s National Transitional Council and other considerations for the forthcoming constitution making process here: http://www.usip.org/publications/extending-libya-s-transitional-period-capitalizing-the-constitutional-moment

Published on October 24, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional change, hp, HP; constitutional design, Jason Gluck, Libya
 
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Libya’s Constitution: Take it Slow

[From the Chicago Tribune] Now that Moammar Gadhafi has fallen, Libya’s victorious revolutionaries should heed Iraq’s missteps as they begin the critical task of political reconstruction, including Iraq’s hurried 2005 constitution-making process. There are as many ways to write a constitution as there are spellings of Gadhafi’s name, and some processes can exacerbate conflict rather

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Published on October 21, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Libya, Tom Ginsburg
 
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The Right to Food in Mexico

As the price of commodities has skyrocketed in recent years, a number of countries have seen citizens take to the street to let the authorities know of their displeasure at the price of their favorite grain — whether it’s rice in Asian countries, wheat in Europe, or corn in Mexico, where tortillas should accompany any

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Published on October 20, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Mexico, right to food, Zachary Elkins
 
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Two new Supreme Court of Canada Justices nominated

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper has just named his two nominees to fill the two vacant seats on the Supreme Court of Canada created with the stepping down of Justices Louise Charron and Ian Binnie from Ontario, who announced their departure earlier this year at the age of 60 and 72 respectively (mandatory retirement age

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Published on October 17, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Ran Hirschl, Supreme Court of Canada