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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
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Egypt update from International IDEA

As Egypt goes to the polls to begin its long process of electing a parliament, I recommend taking a look at an analysis produced by International IDEA of the “Fundamental Principles” document released earlier this month. The document has been widely criticized for trying to cement a role for the military in future politics. His

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Published on November 28, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Egypt, hp, Zaid Al-Ali
 
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Japan’s Supreme Court finds lay participation in criminal trials constitutional

On November 16, 2011 Japan’s Supreme Court ruled that the country’s new “saiban’in” system of citizen participation in serious criminal trials was constitutional. Issued unanimously by all fifteen of the court’s judges sitting en banc as a Grand Bench, this ruling effectively eliminates any constitutional doubts about the system which may have lingered after it

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Published on November 21, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Colin Jones, hp, Japan, jury system
 
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Another chapter in Israel’s constitutional wars

It has been a while since we reported here about Israel’s ongoing constitutional (and culture) wars. The right wing government, and in particular members of the governing coalition who represent religious parties, Jewish settlers and nationalist parts of the Russian immigrant community, have long viewed the Supreme Court as a bastion of liberal secularism and

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Published on November 15, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Israel, Ran Hirschl
 
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Equatorial Guinea heads to polls

Citizens of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea went to the polls today to vote in a referendum on a new constitution. Changes include the imposition of term limits on the president (two seven-year terms in office); the creation of a vice-presidency and Senate; the establishment of economic policy and auditing watchdogs; and an ombudsman. Opponents charge that

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Published on November 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: equatorial guinea, hp, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Voting underway in Equatorial Guinea

Citizens of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea went to the polls today to vote in a referendum on a new constitution. Changes include the imposition of term limits on the president (two seven-year terms in office); the creation of a vice-presidency and Senate; the establishment of economic policy and auditing watchdogs; and an ombudsman. Opponents charge that

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Published on November 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: equatorial guinea, hp, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Nathan Brown tells American advisors: “Put Away Your Quills” in the Mideast

Nathan Brown of George Washington has an excellent new post at foreignpolicy.com in which he argues that Americans have little to say to constitution-makers in the Arab world. He is surely right. My own view is that external advisors are best focused on the nitty-gritty issues of drafting, such as making sure the text is

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Published on November 9, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Tom Ginsburg
 
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The Right to Rebel in Ghana

This is the third in a series of case studies on the Constitutional Right to Rebel: Ghana ———————————————————————————————— The nation of Ghana was formed in 1957 as a sovereign union between the recently independent British protectorates of Gold Coast and Togoland. After an embryonic representative government collapsed in 1966, the country passed from coup to

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Published on November 7, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Ghana, Right to Rebel, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Call for Papers on Comparative Law

As Chair of the Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law, I am pleased to share with our readers the Call for Papers below. The Call for Papers is directed to comparative law scholars who have been engaged as law teachers, lecturers, fellows or another academic capacity for ten years or fewer

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Published on November 4, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Call for Papers, hp, Richard Albert
 
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Iran: Constitutional Politics in a Dictatorship

Last month, the University of Chicago hosted a Conference on Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes. Alas, we did not have a paper on Iran, but it seems that constitutional politics in the world’s favorite theocracy are heating up. Indeed, Iran may be exhibit A for the idea that constitutional politics involve significant stakes even in dictatorships.

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Published on November 3, 2011
Author:          Filed under: authoritarianism, Iran, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Right to Rebel in Venezuela

This is the second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the potential risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel. Case Study 2: Venezuela The seeds

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