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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2010 (Page 5)
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The Evolution and Ideology of Global Constitutionalism

Mila Versteeg and I have just posted to SSRN a paper entitled “The Evolution and Ideology of Global Constitutionalism” that may be of interest to readers of this blog. In this paper, we analyze an original data set that spans the rights-related content of all national constitutions over the last six decades. Our analysis confirms

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Moldova fails to fix political system

It appears that Sunday’s referendum in Moldova failed to generate enough voter interest to fix the country’s political impasse. Europe’s smallest country has been unable to elect a president for a year, and now faces parliamentary dissolution and new elections. The story begins in 2000, when the 1994 Constitution was amended to replace the directly

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Published on September 6, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Moldova, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Freedom of Expression Endangered in South Africa

The post-Apartheid South African press and media have traditionally been vigorous. They have frequently criticized the government as well as opposition groups. The press and media there can sometimes be a bit sensationalistic (hardly unique to South Africa of course). But it’s fair to say that the country’s press freedom has been good overall. This

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Published on September 2, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Mark Kende
 
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USIP Studies of Constitution-Making

The long-awaited volume FRAMING THE STATE IN TIMES OF TRANSITION: CASE STUDIES IN CONSTITUTION MAKING

Published on September 2, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Iraqi constitutional failure and external enforcement?

A couple years ago, my co-authors and I published an examination of constitutions drafted under foreign Occupation. We wanted to ask whether constitutions drafted under such circumstances differ in quality and endurance from other constitutions (the answers were generally not). But we also identified a theoretical problem with such constitutions. In general, one feature of

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Published on August 27, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, iraq, Tom Ginsburg
 
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An Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment?

There has been much debate recently over a federal district court ruling that struck down part of Arizona’s controversial immigration law. The ruling essentially said that the Arizona law was preempted because this is an area of federal authority. The Court did not focus on the argument that the law invited racial profiling and other

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Published on August 19, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Mark Kende
 
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A Culture of Impunity in Niger?

Last week, the interim government of Niger announced a proposed amnesty for the country’s ruling junta in its new draft constitution. State radio channels hailed the action as the best possible outcome for the majority of “social and political forces.” Although the text itself is still being finalized by the constitutional consultative council, the gist

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Published on August 19, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, hp, niger
 
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Nardi on Thai Constitutional Court

Dominic Nardi has a nice short analysis here of Thailand’s constitutional court

Published on August 18, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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A constitutional right to food for India?

The New York Times reports that India’s Congress Party is mulling a constitutional amendment that would guarantee a right to food. Some quick background info, not in the Times piece, to suggest that it might not be much of a surprise (or, as a practical matter, a big deal) if this were to happen: (1)

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Published on August 9, 2010
Author:          Filed under: David Law, hp, India, right to food, socioeconomic rights
 
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Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina dismisses one of its judges

For better or worse, the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina has for a long time been recognized as one of the most important actors in the integration of post-conflict Bosnian society. The role of the Court in such complicated legal and political circumstances is complex, particularly when its decisions can, and certainly do, have

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Published on August 8, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Bosnia, hp, judicial appointments