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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2010 (Page 17)
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Angola constitution coming soon

Press reports indicate that Angola’s parliament will adopt a new constitution in the new week, extending the rule of President Jose Eduardo Dos Santos, who has served since 1979. The constitution will replace the formally semi-presidential structure with a pure presidential system, replacing the prime minister with a vice president. It is seen as strengthening

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Published on January 14, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Togo, Tom Ginsburg
 
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“Allah” and “God” in Malaysia

On New Year’s eve, the Malaysian High Court reportedly ruled that the Catholic Church may lawfully use the term “Allah” to refer to “God.” The judgment is not yet available on the High Court’s website but useful reports are available at the Jurist, on the BBC, and in Time Magazine. In the aftermath of the

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Published on January 11, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Malaysia, religion, Richard Albert
 
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Kenya process continues

The constitution-making process in Kenya continues apace. The Committee of Experts has now submitted a revised harmonized draft to the parliament, which will then submit the document to a referendum. The revised draft retains the semi-presidential structure of the first draft, which has a directly-elected president and a prime minister. The Committee apparently believes that

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Published on January 9, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Kenya, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Popular Consultation in Sudan

Tom, you’re right to highlight Sudan as a possible “hot spot” for constitutional reform in 2010 (and beyond), but not necessarily in the context of “crisis.” This isn’t to say some sort of crisis is out of the question (or even unlikely), but it is not the only scenario in which meaningful constitutional reform might

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Published on January 8, 2010
Author:          Filed under: constitutional change, consultation, federalism, hp, Jason Gluck, Sudan
 
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Japanese “constitutional” change

The Democratic Party of Japan continues its efforts to transform Japanese political practice toward greater congruence with formal demands of the Constitution. Secretary-General Ichiro Ozawa is plotting strategy for a major reform bill, described here, that would reduce the power of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau to appear in the Diet. As a corrolary this would

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Published on January 7, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Japan, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Comparative Constitutional Law Events at the 2010 AALS Annual Meeting

I am looking forward to attending the 2010 AALS Annual Meeting, held this year in New Orleans, starting today, January 6, and running until Sunday, January 10. For the convenience of readers, I have taken a moment to look through the program to highlight the comparative constitutional law events on offer at the AALS. All events,

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Published on January 6, 2010
Author:          Filed under: AALS, hp, Richard Albert
 
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Indo-Pakistani Constitutional Convergence?

The distinctions in constitutional structure between India and Pakistan—not to mention their differences in political culture—are as sharp as they are numerous. To name but a few, India is a federal state tending toward decentralization in a parliamentary system whose constitution proclaims its commitment to secular democracy. In contrast, Pakistan is a federal state with

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New blogger on the site

I’m pleased to announce that Richard Albert of Boston College Law School has joined our ranks of bloggers. Professor Albert is one of the leading young scholars of comparative constitutional law in the United States. He’s published a number of papers, including an excellent article in the American Journal of Comparative Law on the fusion

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Published on January 3, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Constitutional Hotspots for 2010?

I wonder if readers have thoughts on what locations will be likely to experience a constitutional crisis of some kind in 2010. Many of those that have had ongoing difficulties in the past year (Niger, Honduras, Zimbabwe) are likely to continue. Here are some other possibilities: Thailand’s deep political divisions have not been resolved, and

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Published on January 2, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, hp; Tom Ginsburg, Palestine, Sudan, Thailand